Promises, Promises
CHM/CHS-1004 (1968)
 

Side 1:

Promises, Promises (Smith-Hughey-Anderson)
The Worst Is Yet To Come (Anderson-Anderson)
No Another Time (Jerry Lane)
Crying (Orbison-Melson)
Love Of The Common People (Wilkin-Hurley)
A Penny For Your Thoughts (Anderson)

Side 2:
I've Been Everywhere (Mack)
Paper Mansions (Harris)
Two Rolls Of Scotch Tape (Gibson)
Sing Me A Sad Song (Stewart)
A Hundred Times Today (Anderson)
Lie A Little (Anderson)

All Selections BMI except Paper Mansions - SESAC

Produced by:
Slim Williamson & Lloyd Green

 

LISTEN!

    I wish I had a nickel for every time someone has come up to me and asked, “Is Lynn Anderson your sister?” Or, “Is Lynn Anderson your wife. Or (and this one really gets me) “Is Lynn Anderson your daughter?” And Lynn has told me several times that people are constantly asking her, “Is Bill Anderson your brother?” “Is Bill Anderson your husband?” “Is Bill Anderson your father?”
    Actually, I wish I could claim her as my sister, but unfortunately I can’t. Someday she is going to make someone a very lovely wife, but I’m already married and I guess that lets me out. About this father-daughter jazz . . just let it be said I would have only been nine years old when she was born!
    In reality Lynn Anderson is the daughter of talented singer-songwriter Liz Anderson and her husband, Casey. Their end of the Anderson clan comes from up in North Dakota. Mine were all cotton-choppers and peach-pickers from down in Georgia. I’ve been trying real hard for the past few months to strike up a kinship with Lynn, Liz and Casey, but the best we can come up with is a strong friendship and the affectionate tag of “kissin’ cousins.
    Lynn Anderson has made Andersons everywhere extremely proud of her in a relatively short period of time. The Joneses, the Browns and the Smiths dig her, too, but we Andersons strut a little more when she appears on the Lawrence Welk TV show or when one of her hit records is played on the radio, because we know she’s “one of us.”
    This album, Promises, Promises is Lynn’s second for the Chart folks, and, judging from my sneak preview, it’s definitely her finest. This little twenty-year-old, blond-haired, blue-eyed, vivacious package of good looks really knows how to sing and sell a song. Whether it’s a ballad like Sing Me a Sad Song, a lyrically deep folk song like Love of the Common People or a bouncy, wordy song like I’ve Been Everywhere, Lynn Anderson knows how to put it across. And the title song, Promises, Promises, is one of Lynn’s current best-selling single records,
    I wish I could legally claim kin to Lynn Anderson because she’s what my folks always called “good people.” I wish I could even write a song she’d like well enough to record, but Mama Liz and Daddy Casey keep her pretty well supplied. I guess I’ll just have to be content to be one of Lynn Anderson’s biggest fans and happy we have the same name. Maybe someday they’ll accidentally send me her royalty check!

Bill Anderson